Clark Hall

Advancing understanding of the environment through interdisciplinary scientific research & education.

Trees

Advancing understanding of the environment through interdisciplinary scientific research & education.

Clark Hall

Advancing understanding of the environment through interdisciplinary scientific research & education.

Trees

Advancing understanding of the environment through interdisciplinary scientific research & education.

Dept. grad students Ferguson and Cook win R.J. Husky Graduate Research poster awards

Environmental Sciences students Amy Ferguson and Brynn Cook won top awards for posters at the 2017 Robert J. Huskey Graduate Research Exhibition. Amy’s poster “Making the case for nature-based solutions to coastal erosion in Virginia’s coastal bays” tied for 1st Place in Division 1 – Natural Sciences Poster Presentation. Brynn’s poster won 1st Place in Division 2 – Natural Sciences Poster Presentation. The R.J. Huskey exhibition showcases the work done by graduate students at the University of Virginia.

VCR LTER contributes to synthesis on coastal armoring

Recent work from researchers at several LTER sites has synthesized the current understanding of ecological impacts of man-made coastal armoring. The study looked at diverse systems, including constructed oyster reefs at the Virginia Coast Reserve LTER. Former UVA Environmental Sciences student Kyle Emery (now a PhD student at UC Santa Barbara) is a coauthor on the study and is quoted in an article on the knowledge gaps it identified.

Aboriginal “Defending the Ocean with Art” exhibit in Clark’s Brown Library

The Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Museum in association with the Environmental Sciences Department opens the exhibit “Defending the Ocean with Art” on Friday August 25th at 4pm (reception at 5pm) in the Brown Library of Clark Hall. On view are twenty-one sculptures and prints by contemporary indigenous artists that celebrate the central importance of the ocean to human life and responds to its current threats. Plastic debris and abandoned fishing nets are trapping and killing a rich array of marine life, eventually drifting to the bottom of the sea, suffocating the seabed and coral reefs.

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